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Staying at home causes us to remember the good in life

Coronavirus. COVID-19. The Rona. Whatever you call it, coronavirus has changed almost every American’s life in one way or another.  For me, besides school being canceled and nearly every event that I’ve been looking forward to, coronavirus took away one of my favorite things: my job. 

Just to clarify, I am aware that me working has been put on temporary hiatus for a good reason. I work with kids as a gymnastics, cheer, tumbling and ninja coach and I do not want to put any one of my students or their family’s health at risk.  

I’m probably one of the very few teenagers who enjoys working.  In my opinion, I have one of the most entertaining jobs out there. I love sharing my passion for gymnastics, cheer tumbling and ninja zone with my students.  

I look forward to going to work, and the last month and a half since the gym has closed has been difficult. I miss seeing all of my students, my coworkers, the parents and the gym itself.

All this time off of work has reminded me of something important.  It’s a good thing that I am missing coaching, as it means that I am working a job that I truly enjoy. I believe everyone should have the opportunity to work a job they enjoy, and this virus has shown me that.

We are not guaranteed all the time in the world. One day, I will eventually have to leave my job coaching for one reason or another. 

As a society, we move fast. Due to this pandemic, the world has been forced to slow down, which has both its good parts and its bad parts.

The bad parts are obvious. They are broadcasted nearly every night on our TVs on every news station.  It has become difficult to watch a news broadcast without hearing the word “coronavirus.”

The good parts are not nearly as obvious. In one of my all time favorite movies, Ferris Bueller’s Day Off, the main character, Ferris Bueller, famously says in the movie that “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.”

Times like these remind us to look at the good things. Instead of grieving the memories we missed out on, we should try to cherish the memories we had.  

I miss my students and would go back to the gym in a heartbeat to coach them if I could.  

Unfortunately, that’s not possible. I can wish all I want, but for the time being I cannot go back to the gym.  

I will, however, cherish the time that I had at work. I am unbelievably lucky to work a job where I am surrounded by positivity, and I am so glad I got to experience this.  

These times at home and away from the hustle of everyday life are strange, but they give us time to remember the good things in life. So my suggestion to you is to try and focus on the good memories you got to have, not the ones you missed.

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